After The Election

After a winner is announced in a Presidential election, the U.S. begins a peaceful transition of power from the President to the President-elect in order to sustain our democracy. How can being a good citizen support our changing government? Civic engagement, no matter who won or lost, is vital to maintain a democracy, especially in times of change. Below are LearningMedia resources to engage students with information about good citizenship and how to participate in civic discourse.

Resources to Honor the Life of Poet Maya Angelou
Renaissance woman, civil rights activist, and poet Maya Angelou gave a recitation of her poem "On the Pulse of Morning" at the 1993 inauguration of President Bill Clinton. She died at the age of 86 in 2014.

 

Grades 7-12

The Presidents - Primary Source: JFK's Inaugural Address, 1961
In this 1961 address, JFK concluded, "ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." Learn more with this primary source, from American Experience: "JFK."

 

Grades 9-12

The Presidents - Primary Source: FDR's First Inaugural Address, 1933
In March of 1933, FDR told Americans the only thing they have to fear is fear itself. Learn more with this primary source, from American Experience: "FDR."

 

Grades 9-12

Citizenship: Making Government Work | Democracy in America
Explore the concept of citizenship, review the definition of being a United States citizen and the rights associated with citizenship, then learn about the naturalization process and test your knowledge with a 20-question civics exam in this Democracy in America interactive activity from Annenberg Learner.

 

Grades 12-13+

Digital Media as a Civic Engagement Tool | Women's Empowerment | Lesson 6
Shayfeen.com relies heavily on media to deliver its messages and get citizens involved. This presents an interesting opportunity to explore the role of modern media in political/social justice activism. Students examine the overall strategies of Shayfeen.com, with an emphasis on media and the Internet. They will analyze how these tools work in less developed nations or in areas where media access is limited. In addition, they will evaluate the savvy, resources, skills and support needed to develop effective media outreach. Students will also explore social networking and video as empowerment tools.

 

Grades 9-13+

Teach Civic Engagement Using Social Media with KQED Do Now: Online PD Module
In this one hour self-paced tutorial, learn how to implement KQED Do Now in your classroom. KQED Do Now is a weekly activity for students to engage and respond to current issues using social media tools like Twitter. KQED aims to introduce 21st century skills and add value to learning through the integration of relevant content and new media tools and technologies. Do Now gives students a chance to practice civic engagement and digital citizenship skills while they explore ways to connect topics in their classes to the present day.

 

Grades 6-13+

Nine Stories Made by and About Young People Making a Difference
Discover how young people are giving back to their communities with a video showcasing one student's work, produced through the PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs program.

 

Grades 7-12

Other Lessons | Making Civics Real: Civic Engagement
The approach to service learning in social studies explained in this article is based on the work of the Close Up Foundation and the Constitutional Rights Foundation in Los Angeles in developing Active Citizenship Today (ACT). ACT is a unique social studies service learning program because it includes the analysis of public policy as a crucial step in the service learning process.

 

Grades 9-13+

Blogging, Civic Engagement and the DREAM Act
This multi-task lesson asks students to look at the DREAM Act in the context of immigration reform and also to reflect on blogging as civic engagement. They'll research the DREAM Act and use clips from the film Don't Tell Anyone (No Le Digas a Nadie), which features the experience of undocumented immigrant and blogger Angy Rivera, to look at the human side of this policy issue

 

Grades 9-13+

Taking a Stand
This activity focuses on the different faces of civic engagement by highlighting the many voices of protest against forced labor. Students will read and analyze primary source documents that argued against forced labor. They will also consider what is necessary to spark legislative change. Lastly, students are introduced to forms of modern day slavery and given the chance to develop public awareness campaigns.

 

Grades 9-13+

Youth Engaged in Service
This episode of NJEA's Classroom Close-up highlights the Youth Engaged in Service program at Hillside Intermediate School. The school integrates service learning across the curriculum. In science, students learn how to protect local environments. In language arts, students write and illustrate books for children. The school participates in projects that improve the lives of people and animals, as well as projects that promote environmental stewardship. Students have many opportunities to work directly with the people in the community that they are helping. Technology is used to document the service learning projects.

 

Grades 13+

Five Habits to Heal the Heart of Democracy By Parker Palmer | Global Oneness Project
In this article, Parker Palmer presents qualities of citizenship that are essential for sustaining democracy in troubled times. Palmer suggests that we must value our differences, draw inspiration and greater understanding from contradictions, and celebrate the power of community building to restore our democratic society.
Photograph by AMNESIAC_ARTS

 

Grades 7-13+

Repairing the Fabric of Democracy | Lesson Plan | Global Oneness Project
Students read a short article, "Five Habits to Heal the Heart of Democracy," by Parker Palmer who presents qualities of citizenship that are essential for sustaining democracy in troubled times. Palmer suggests that we must value our differences, draw inspiration and greater understanding from contradictions, and celebrate the power of community building to restore our democratic society.
In this lesson, students discuss the values and efforts that contribute to a healthy democracy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.
Photograph by AMNESIAC_ARTS

 

Grades 9-13+